Hong Kong teen is imprisoned for insulting the Chinese flag

Views: 43
0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 32 Second

A teenager from Hong Kong was sentenced on Tuesday to spend four months in jail for insulting China’s flag and illegal assembly, with Beijing steadily threatening influential activists in financial centers. Tony Chung, 19, chief of a now-disbanded party in defense of democracy, was convicted earlier this month of scuffling outside Hong Kong for throwing the Chinese flag into the dirt.

Chung would await the trial of a “secession,” indicating that he could end up in life imprisonment under the oppressive Beijing National Security Act imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, thus completing his term.

Chung was the first public official to face law enforcement, who was characterized as a “sword” by Beijing, after seven months of huge, sometimes violence-friendly democratic demonstrations last year, to restore “order and stability” to the financial center.

insulting

He had been accused of offending the national flag and unconstitutional assembly for every three months and was ordered to serve behind bars for four months.

Youth are also faced with separate money-laundering allegations and conspiracies to post sedative material.

In late October Chung was arrested and detained by the plainclothes police outside the American Consulate.

Speculation swirled that Chung had moved from the authorities because he hoped to seek refuge in the U.S. consulate in Hong Kong.

More and more pro-democracy militants across Hong Kong have fled after Beijing escalated its suppression of demonstrations in the town against authoritarian rule in China.

The security legislation provides for ambiguous and yet dangerous crimes like “subversion” and “collusion with foreign forces” to be alleged in dissent rather than actions.

The law also overthrew the legal barrier in China, allowing suspect extradition across borders for prosecution between internationally-recognized common law judiciary and the opaque, party-controlled justice in mainland China.

Last Sunday, Chinese State TV CGTN reported that the Hong Kong police have put 30 people, including the self-exiled activists’ Ted Hui and Baggio Leung, on their requested list of suspects of violating national security laws.

Either influential activists in Hong Kong stay in prison or face numerous arrests and many allegations, including Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow.

Jimmy Lai was also put under house arrest and deprived of public opinion — his account on Twitter included — by the High Court of Hong Kong’s baile last week. Jimmy Lai has also been charged with the national security rule.

However, the ruling brought serious opposition from China, which menaced Lai’s trial in the mainland.

Chung would await the trial of a “secession,” indicating that he could end up in life imprisonment under the oppressive Beijing National Security Act imposed on Hong Kong on June 30, thus completing his term.

Chung was the first public official to face law enforcement, who was characterized as a “sword” by Beijing, after seven months of huge, sometimes violence-friendly democratic demonstrations last year, to restore “order and stability” to the financial center youth are also faced with separate money-laundering allegations and conspiracies to post sedative material.

In late October Chung was arrested and detained by the plainclothes police outside the American Consulate.

Insulting the Chinese flag

Speculation swirled that Chung had moved from the authorities because he hoped to seek refuge in the U.S. consulate in Hong Kong.

More and more pro-democracy militants across Hong Kong have fled after Beijing escalated its suppression of demonstrations in the town against authoritarian rule in China.

The security legislation provides for ambiguous and yet dangerous crimes like “subversion” and “collusion with foreign forces” to be alleged in dissent rather than actions.

Last Sunday, Chinese State TV CGTN reported that the Hong Kong police have put 30 people, including the self-exiled activist Ted Hui and Baggio Leung, on their requested list of suspects of violating national security laws.

Either influential activists in Hong Kong stay in prison or face numerous arrests and many allegations, including Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow.

Jimmy Lai was also put under house arrest and deprived of public opinion — his account on Twitter included — by the High Court of Hong Kong’s baile last week. Jimmy Lai has also been charged with the national security rule.

However, the ruling brought serious opposition from China, which menaced Lai’s trial in the mainland.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleppy
Sleppy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Comment